Multicultural Resources – Heart Disease and Stroke

African Canadians Chinese Farsi First Nations, Inuits & Metis South Asians

Women of some ethnic backgrounds can have special risks for heart disease and stroke. Research shows that African and Caribbean Canadians, First Nations, Inuit and Métis people, and South Asians from India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka have a greater chance of developing high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.
There are a number of reasons why women from these ethnic and cultural backgrounds have higher risk profiles:

  • Their genetic makeup can make them more susceptible to some of the underlying causes of heart disease and stroke, including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity.
  • Their diet or lifestyle may put them at higher risk.
  • Language or cultural barriers may make it difficult or intimidating for them to seek medical attention.

If you belong to one of these higher-risk ethnic groups, you need to discuss your risk profile with your doctor. It’s also important to know how to make heart-healthy choices in your day-to-day life. No matter what your ethnic background, you can reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke!

Farsi

For people whose first language is Farsi, cultural and language barriers may make it difficult for them to access important health and disease prevention information. These barriers can also make it intimidating to get the medical treatment they need.

To make vital health information more accessible for people who speak Farsi, The Heart and Stroke Foundation website offers a variety of heart health information materials translated into Farsi.

South Asian

Research has shown that women of South Asian descent—from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh—are more likely to have high blood pressure and diabetes and are at greater risk of heart disease and stroke than the general population.

Prevention and early treatment of heart disease among this high-risk population could result in lives saved.

The Heart and Stroke Foundation website offers heart health resources in Hindi, Punjabi, Tamil and Urdu.

Chinese

For people whose first language is Cantonese or Mandarin, cultural and language barriers may make it difficult to access important health and disease prevention information. These barriers can also make it intimidating to get the medical treatment they need.

To make vital health information more accessible for people who speak Cantonese or Mandarin, The Heart and Stroke Foundation offers a variety of health information materials translated into these languages.

If you have a friend or relative who would benefit from heart disease and stroke information delivered in Cantonese or Mandarin, please direct them to the resources available to them on the Heart and Stroke Foundation website.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis

Research has shown that First Nations, Inuit and Métis persons are more likely to have high blood pressure and diabetes and are at greater risk of heart disease and stroke than the general population.

As a First Nations, Inuit or Métis woman, you can manage your added risk by making healthy changes in your lifestyle. It’s especially important for you to maintain a healthy weight, stop smoking, get 30 minutes of exercise each day and have yourself tested for diabetes and high blood pressure.

See the Prevention section of this website for more information on how to reduce your risks and prevent heart disease and stroke.

The Heart and Stroke Foundation has published a video, titled Heartbeat of the Anishnawbe Nation, which shows how Aboriginal peoples can manage their risk of heart disease and stroke through a balance of medical and Aboriginal traditions. The video is available in Ojibwe, Oji-Cree and English. This video, and more heart health resources for First Nations, Inuit or Métis peoples are available on the Heart and Stroke Foundation website.

African Canadian

Research has shown that women of African descent are more likely to have high blood pressure and diabetes and are at greater risk of heart disease and stroke than the general population.

As an African Canadian woman, you can manage your added risk by making healthy changes in your lifestyle. It’s especially important for you to maintain a healthy weight; don’t smoke, get 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each day and have yourself tested for diabetes and high blood pressure.

See the Prevention section of this website for more information on how to reduce your risks and prevent heart disease and stroke.

 

Find more heart health resources for African Canadians on the Heart and Stroke Foundation website.